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CAKE WITH CHERRIES
 
Great tutorial by Gosia Suchodolska, shows how to make a realistic cake "yeast" of modeling clay.
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LATO W MUZEUM
 
Przygotowaliśmy ofertę wakacyjną dla dzieci, które spędzają lato w mieście lub przyjadą do stolicy aby poznać zabytki i muzea Warszawy. Wśród letnich wycieczek nie może zabraknąć wizyty w naszym niezwykłym, tajemniczym i inspirującym Muzeum!
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konkurs DOMEK DLA LALEK OGÓLNOPOLSKI KONKURS PLASTYCZNY DLA DZIECI I MŁODZIEŻY
 
Dziś ogłaszamy listę autorów nagrodzonych i wyróżnionych prac. Oficjalne ogłoszenie wyników już 1 czerwca o 12:00 w Muzeum Domków dla Lalek w Warszawie!
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ART CONTEST FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH
 
MÓJ WYMARZONY DOMEK DLA LALEK! Zapraszamy dzieci i młodzież w wieku 6 - 16 lat do przesyłania swoich prac plastycznych!
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GALLERY OF DOLLS' HOUSES AND FURNISHINGS


Dolls' houses impress us with their diversity. The houses, as well as, their meticulously crafted furnishings and inhabitants – often antique dolls – deserve our special attention. We invite you to take a closer look at some of the most interesting collectors' and museum showpieces.
We would like to thank the owners of the exhibits, for making the pictures of their exhibits available to us.



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KOLEKCJA ANETY POPIEL-MACHNICKIEJ

Soon the permanent exhibition Dollhouses Museum in Warsaw.

Aneta Popiel-Machnicka - film director and screenwriter, for over 10 years has been collecting restoring and refurbishing together with her children vintage dollhouses. She is the forerunner of promoting this unusual and enjoyable hobby in Poland. Her collection, the largest in this part of Europe,currently contains nearly 100 dollhouses, rooms, bathrooms and shops for dolls and is constantly growing. The collection is unceasingly presented for temporary exhibitions at museums all over Poland. In 2016 the dollhouses will finally settle down in the Museum of dollhouses in Warsaw.

And here is what the collection owner speaks herself about her passion:

The vintage dollhouses provide a surprisingly accurate view of the world. These are a kind of stop-frames of the times in which they were created. You can look at many aspects of life - not just everyday life. You can follow not only the facilities on household works, changes in tastes and preferences, technology, furniture and interior design, but also the gradual social changes taking place in the class structure. These tiny buildings can really call our attention by their unusual charm, which makes it impossible to pass by unnoticeably. Therefore dollhouses are so appreciated by both historians, cultural researchers, sociologists, psychologists, scene designers, designers as well as collectors. And, of course children love it, these small ones and these quite grown ups.

Fascination at first - usually accidental contact with life in miniature.Sometimes many people discover that it turns out to be their life passion.They become dedicated and focused on this kind of passion, for them it's life passion. If you have any manual skills- just watching the tiny world will be no longer sufficent. You start to think about your own dollhouse.You drag down an old dollhouse,which once belonged to your grandmother, from the attic, you renovate a nightstand or buy a ready-to-assemble set kit. You begin to look at the world around you and objects from a different perspective.







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MON PLAISIR - about 1704-1751

Courtesy of Collections of the Palace Museum in Arnstadt.

Arnstadt - one of the oldest German cities, due to its location often called "the gateway to the Thuringian Forest," is famous for its relics of John Sebastian Bach, and having no equal in the world, beautiful and stunning craftsmanship, extraordinary collection created by Princess Augusta Dorothea von Schwarzburg - Arnstadt's (1666-1751).

This collection, which is a gem of cultural history today by the owner was called "Mon Plaisir" - "My pleasure," and depicts the life of late baroque town seized in 82 different scenes. It occurs in one of over 350 carefully made ​​wax dolls. Each is individualized. With the dress and accessories is clearly marked function and membership of a social class.

These scenes are still very valuable source of information about how the court functioned lives and working conditions as they looked different layers of middle-class in the first half of the eighteenth century. We can look at the typical tools used at that time and see how their services have provided tailor, shoemaker or hairdresser and see the studio back-eighteenth-century artisans - turner, weaver, cooper, butcher, and many, many others. At the market full of traders and buyers, we perceive a number of artisans carrying his small workshop, and a small touring troupe of circus performers. In the city of dolls of Princess Augusta Dorothea could not miss the theater, inn, and even the court and numerous representations of scenes of religious life.

Over 1 / 3 of episodes of shows court life - both the official representative (social gatherings) as well as intimate scenes (mother in childbirth, dressing and beauty treatments for ladies) up to the show functioned as stables, laundries and other facilities - including the kitchen and logistics of the Ducal Palace. Interestingly, a recent study has determined that it was probably a lot of dolls in the Ursuline convent at Erfurt, and that they are faithful portraits of people from the vicinity of the Princess.

The princess Augusta Dorothea in his youth when left a widow and childless, despite the resulting larger problems - including legal and financial - for over 35 years, using local, nameless today's craftsmen and the Ursuline Sisters of passion created his vision of the city of dolls - allowing you to today "her pleasure "was also a pleasure for our eyes and minds.

In 1765, fourteen years after her death, the castle where she lived and created, it was sold and intended for demolition. Amazing collection, partially destroyed poor conditions of storage and lack of maintenance - went through various vicissitudes and finally in 1931 become a part of the Palace Museum Arnstadt.

The photos of the Castle Museum collections in Arnstadt
Collection of dolls "Mon Plaisir", the first half of the eighteenth century

Fragment of the urban market, fot: Detlef Marszałek
Weaving Workshop, fot: Detlef Marszałek
Evening meeting, fot: Detlef Marszałek
Slaughterhouse, fot: Frank Mihm
Living room with porcelain, fot: Detlef Marszałek
Lounge music, fot: Detlef Marszałek
The palace kitchen, fot: Detlef Marszałek
In closet, fot: Frank Mihm
Return from hunting, fot: Detlef Marszałek
Musicians. fot: Detlef Marszałek



For more information visit a website Palace Museum Collection in Arnstadt.

APM




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DOLL HOUSE OF QUEEN MARY- 1920

Courtesy of The Royal Collection - Windsor Castel in London.

It is one of the most famous and beautiful miniature houses that have ever been made. It is not only famous for exceptional craft of artists and artisans who made this house together, but also for romantic story of its origin.

It was 1920, the Great Britain was slowly recuperating after the First World War shock. The subjects of the Queen Mary (who was a grandmother of currently reigning Elizabeth II) wanted to thank her for her devotion that she offered to the ordinary men during those rough times. The Queen’s cousin – Princess Mary Louise, had an idea then to create a miniature replica of Windsor Castle which not only would be an extraordinary gift but also and most of all, it would be an amazing historical document concerning the royal family life of the time.

Sir Edwin Lutyens, a prominent architect of that time, invited by the initiator of the idea, elaborated a detailed design of the miniature house (which, as a result, is not a replica of Windsor Castle, but “an ideal house for upper classes”), while the princess engaged herself in organizational matters. She started with sending letters to the most eminent English artist, craftsmen, and manufacturers, initiating their participation in equipping the castle. The chosen scale for the house’s construction was 1:12. The house is over 1 meter high and it can be viewed from every side thanks to the curtain front. Richly equipped rooms were executed by the company specializing in expert model-making - Twining Models at Northampton and several other companies from different branches. Carbon copies of Windsors’ stuccoworks, wallpapers, carpets, curtains and furniture, as well as, china, cutlery and equipment of kitchen, laundry, workshops, and garden were made.

Each room was furnished with a care for the smallest detail. In a bathroom you can find a tiny toilet paper that can be unrolled, towels with embroideries, and cosmetic products’ imitations. Toothbrushes were made with ivory and real, soft bristle from the inner part of goat’s ear. Taps are movable and water pipes together with electrical wiring work as in a normal house – even a toilet cistern in a several centimetres toilet is working. Chandeliers were decorated with Czech Bohemia crystals.

The miniature furniture was made according to every rule of carpenter’s work – e.g. drawers have got dovetail joints, and decorations, gliding and inlays are marvellous with their precision. Bed mattresses, bedclothes (also the one in the wardrobes), blankets, table napkins and pillows – all of them are ideal, real replica of normal objects of everyday use, and also of those extraordinary – as regalia which were made from real precious stones. The house is decorated with drawings and paintings – works of artists-miniaturists.

One of the most interesting places is library which contains a book collection of over 200 hundred amazing leather bound books prepared by Sangorski & Sutcliffe company. Well-known authors were asked by Princess Mary Louise for their contribution to the replica in a form of their own works. Great writers as Joseph Conrad, Robert Graves, Aldous Huxley or Arthur Conan Doyle had filled in miniature pages with their own handwriting, and famous figures of stage and screen, together with army men and politicians placed signatures in these books. What’s interesting, it is said that the author who refused to participate in this venture was George Bernard Shaw. Ernest Shepard, a creator of Winnie-the-Pooh graphic form, designed and made bookplates for each book.

In the basement there are miniature bottles maturing with labels as Chateau Margaux, professionally corked up and waxed. In a larder, beside vegetables and fruit, flour, cereals, and sugar, there are also Chocolates Fry, McVitie biscuits, candies in glass jars and Frank Cooper’s marmalade wrapped with brown paper and string.

A spacious garage contains a miniature bike with working brakes, Rudge motorbike with a basket, Rolls Royce seven-seater limousine, Landaulet, Vauxhall, Sunbeam and two Daimlers. There is a hand painted royal coat-of-arms on every car.

The garden is inlaid with cut green velvet and decorated with flowerbeds, benches, and sculptures. You can also find gardening tools, butterflies, and even a minute snail here.

APM
translation: Monika Matykiewicz / Frog Translation


 

THE NUREMBERG HOUSE - 1673

Courtesy of V&A Museum of Childhood in London.

This house was made in Nuremberg in 1673 - the date is written on the chimney. It is the oldest house in the Museum.

Wealthy people who could afford to commission specialist craftsmen to make miniatures of the full-sized versions that they normally made owned the house. The house served an important role, according to historical records of the time, as visual aids for the young girls in the household in learning domestic skills.

There are several clues about the family who would have owned a house like this. In those days a sign or picture would indicate what services a business offered. In this case there is a unicorn on the left door, meaning that the house belonged to an apothecary or chemist. The family was clearly interested in religion as on the right door there is a picture of the important religious figure, Martin Luther (1483-1546), and there are some prayer books in the bedroom. The house itself is comfortable, with a well-equipped 'best' kitchen downstairs on the left, which was used to entertain guests.

AG


MRS. BRYANT'S PLEASURE - 1860

Courtesy of V&A Museum of Childhood in London.

This house is a good example of a dolls' house, which was not a child's plaything. Instead it was made for a lady called Mrs. Bryant in the early 1860s, who wanted to make a miniature record of the interior of her home.

She commissioned a professional cabinet-maker to make the pieces of furniture, which were made with remarkable skill and accuracy. The rooms are furnished in exactly the same way, as a middle-class home of the time would have been. The wallpaper is the same pattern that Mrs. Bryant would have had on her walls at home. Bathrooms became more widespread in the 1890s, so here, the bedrooms are equipped with washstands and basins.

The kitchen is surprisingly small. A real kitchen in a middle-class household would have been considerably larger in order to accommodate the wide range of kitchen equipment needed. Among the miniature china are some well-known designs such as the famous Willow pattern.

AG


AMY MILE'S HOUSE - 1890

Courtesy of V&A Museum of Childhood in London.

Made in 1890 for a little girl called Amy Miles, this house contains some of the latest domestic technology of the time in miniature, a billiard room, and separate nursery and schoolroom.

Almost all of the contents are contemporary with the house and give us a sense of what it must have been like to live in a real house of the time. A house like this would have belonged to a very well-to-do and up-to-date family, who liked to enjoy themselves. In the room next to the kitchen is a bicycle and there is a billiard room on the first floor. There are several labour saving gadgets, including a knife cleaner, a telephone and carpet sweeper. In the bathroom is a geyser for heating up water for the bath. Surprisingly for such a large house, there is only one bedroom but there is a nursery and a schoolroom.

AG


THE BOUDOIR - 2007

'The Boudoir's is a 1/12 scale, porcelain doll made by a miniature artist Lisa Johnson-Richards. The inspiration for this piece came from an old Edwardian postcard.

The work on 'The Boudoir' lasted almost three weeks and entailed:
  1. Pouring/Cleaning/Sculpting:
    It took around 3 days to pour, clean and sculpt the greenware into the position of the doll. The legs were fairly easy to sculpt as were the shoes which she sculpted from a basic lag and shoe shape, bending the leg as it would look in 'real life'. The body was a little more challenging because of the position in which she was bending, Lisa needed to get the balance right and she was not sure if the doll would fire okay as there was quite a lot of 'tweaking' to get everything 'just-so' - sometimes a firing can be unsuccessful when the green ware has been manipulated too much. In the end it worked out just fine though.

  2. Painting:
    Painting takes anything from 10 to 14 days to do. Lisa's technique is to layer the colors firing in between each time - it's a lengthy process, but she finds the results she achieves this way to be very realistic and that's what she is aiming for.

  3. Costuming:
    This can be a lengthy process to and it's different each time. Making a pattern comes first, this takes around 1 to 2 days depending how detailed or difficult the costume is...Lisa sources reference from her many fashion plate books, or actual patterns from various eras in time.

The Boudoir is a part of a Limited Edition, with only 5 dolls ever made.

For more information on Lisa's work, please see her website Lisa Johnson-Richards, Miniature Doll Artist and Couturiere.

AG


CARABOSSE DOLLS: The Polish Dancer

'Carabosse Dolls' are unique, 1/12 scale craftsmanship creations representing ladies of different historical periods, characters of famous ballets, films, fairy tales, and mythological figures.

'The Polish Dancer' is a part of the 'National Dress' collection, presenting the cultural richness and diversity of Spain and other countries. The doll is dressed in the traditional costume from the region of Lowicz in Poland, trimmed with silk ribbon embroideries.

About the Artist:

Maria Jose Santos began the creation of dolls in at the age of 5, after attending a class in reproduction of antique dolls, where she learned the proper techniques of polishing, baking and enameling porcelain. Today her pieces are incorporated onto permanent and temporary exhibits of miniature museums around the world (e.g. Puppenhausmuseum of Basel, Switzerland, Toy & Miniature Museum of Kansas City, USA, Kathleen Browning Miniatures Collection in the Kentucky Gateway Museum Center, USA and others).

The entire collection by Maria Jose Santos can be seen at Carabosse Dolls.

AG


 
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COMING JUNE 1, 2016 - OPENING OF THE MUSEUM OF DOLLHOUSES IN WARSAW!
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MUZEUM DOMKÓW DLA LALEK - niezwykłe miejsce w samym centrum Warszawy, w tajemniczych, niedostępnych dotąd dla zwiedzających wnętrzach Pałacu Kultury i Nauki już rozpoczęło swoją działalność.
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